Home | Business Directory | Footy Classifieds | Job Listings | Refer A Friend | Login | Register


Navigation

  Home
 
  Aussie Rules Fun Stuff
 
  Aussie Rules Information
 
  Aussie Rules Merchandise
 
  Aussie Rules Newsdesk
 
  Jolimont-The Spiritual Home Of Australian Rules Football
 
  Site Map
 
  Links-Aussie Rules on the Internet


Sportsbet



Australian Football League (AFL) on eBay



 
Gone, But Not Forgotten

Gone, But Not Forgotten

Some are legendary, some are unknown, but they all played a vital part in the history of not only the VFL/AFL, but also the game in general as well.

Take a trip down memory lane and look at the old VFL/AFL gounds that are 'Gone, but not forgotten'...

Carlton FC
Euroa Oval
Madeleine Street Oval
Princes Park Oval
Princes Park-Southern End
Royal Park
The Triangle, Princes Park

Collingwood FC
Darling Gardens
Victoria Park

Essendon FC
Ailsa Estate
Brisbane Exhibition Ground
East Melbourne Cricket Ground
Windy Hill

Fitzroy FC
Brunswick Street Oval
Canberra Stadium
Junction Oval
North Hobart Oval
Princes Park Oval
Victoria Park
Whitten Oval

Footscray FC
Princes Park Oval
Whitten Oval
Yallourn Oval
Yarraville Oval

Fremantle FC
WACA

Geelong FC
Argyle Square
Corio Oval

Hawthorn FC
East Melbourne Cricket Ground
Glenferrie Oval
Grace Park
Princes Park Oval
Punt Road Oval
Richmond Racecourse
St.James Park

Waverley Park

Melbourne FC
Jolimont Park
Melbourne Motordrome

North Melbourne FC
Arden Street Oval
Coburg City Oval
Royal Park

Richmond FC
Punt Road Oval

South Melbourne FC
Albury Sports Ground
Lakeside Oval
Toorak Park

St.Kilda FC
Alpaca Paddock
Junction Oval
Moorabbin Oval
Toorak Park
Waverley Park

University FC
East Melbourne Cricket Ground

West Coast FC
WACA


Ailsa Estate



(Essendon FC)
'Ailsa Estate' was the name of the property on Mt.Alexander Rd., Ascot Vale, owned by the founder and first President of Essendon FC, Robert McCracken.

It was on this estate that, not only was the first meeting held to form the club, but also the first game by Essendon FC was played in 1873. 

The club then played games at 'McCrackens Paddock' on Kent St., then moved to Flemington Hill.

Three years later, Robert died. After his widow, Margaret, died in 1905, Roberts son, Alex (Secretary of Essendon FC and later VFL President), ordered that the property be put up for sale. And so it was in 1907.

It was purchased in 1908 by the Sisters of Mercy and became the Mercy Teachers College. For reasons unknown, 'Ailsa' was destroyed in 1936, and the above building was constructed on the same site.

All that remains of the original property is a small building which was once part of the coachmans quarters, and this building was used as the student counsellor's office.

In 2007, the property was purchased for an estimated $7 million by the Church of Scientology as a replacement for their Russell St. headquarters in Melbourne. A spokesperson for the organisation has stated that the building would be restored and re-named 'Ailsa' once again.

Albury Sports Ground

(South Melbourne FC)
In 1952, the VFL dedicated Round 8 as the 'National Day Round' and scheduled all six games to be played at either regional or Interstate venues.

South Melbourne FC played their 'Home' game against North Melbourne FC at the Albury Sports Ground in Albury, New South Wales.

South Melbourne won by 22 points.


Alpaca Paddock



(St.Kilda FC)
After St.Kilda FC was formed at a meeting on April 4, 1873, the club played on the Alpaca Paddock.

This was a patch of turf which, in the 1860's, had been used for an ill-fated attempt to breed the South American animals.

Games were played at this location until 1886, when the team, after some disorganised years from 1879 to 1885, was readmitted into the senior ranks of the VFA. It was then that St.Kilda was allowed to play matches at the St.Kilda Cricket Ground.

The St.Kilda State Primary SChool (above) was later built on the site of the Alpaca Paddock.


Arden Street Oval



(North Melbourne FC)

 
(Above) Watch 'Around The Grounds' with Billy Miller

North Melbourne played its first match at Arden Street on April 29, 1882, defeating its opponent, Royal Park, 2.9 to 0.2.

No games were played at the ground in 1897, due to the ground being reconstructed

The next time North Melbourne left Arden Street was in 1965, when the club played at Coburg City Oval for one year before returning in 1966.

In 1985, the club used the MCG as their Home ground, but played their last game at Arden Street against Richmond on August 17 that year. They stiil use Arden Street as their training and administration base.

In 1999, North Melbourne changed their name to 'The Kangaroos FC' and began playing some home games in Sydney.

n recent years they have played some Home games at Manuka Oval in the ACT, as well as at Carrara Staium on the Gold Coast.

In 2007, the name North Melbourne FC made a welcome re-appearance on their logo, and from 2008 they have reverted back to being called North Melbourne FC.

In 2006, part of the grandstand at Arden Street was destroyed by fire, forcing the club to move their training to the Telstra Dome. They also started playing some Home matches there the same year. Major re-building at Arden Street was finished in 2009, allowing the club to resume using it as their training and administration base once again.

For many years Arden Street Oval was known as the 'Gasometer Oval', due to it being in the shadows of a huge Gasometer (now demolished).

It was also well remembered for the day an Elephant, promoting the visiting Ashtons Circus, ran wild around the boundary line at half-time of a North Melbourne vs. Collingwood match in the late 1970's.


Argyle Square

     


(Geelong FC)
A paddock on the corner of Pakington and Aberdeen Sts., Ashby (renamed Geelong West) named 'Argyle Square' was the venue of the Geelong FC's first match (vs. Melbourne) in 1860. It was a scoreless draw.

The paddock was adjacent to the Argyle Hotel at 30 Aberdeen Street, and is now called Irish Murphy's Pub.

Pakington St. was to become a major shopping precinct in later years.

The pictures above show Pakington street and a Pakington St. tram in the early 1900's.

Geelong stayed at 'Argyle Square' until 1877, when they returned to Corio Oval, the place where they had their first kick of a football back in 1859. They did, however begin playing some games at Corio Oval in 1871 whenever 'Argyle Square' was unavailable.

Brisbane Exhibition Ground



 

(Geelong FC)
'National Day Round' in Round 8 1952 saw Geelong FC have their 'Home' game (against Essendon FC) transferred up North to the Brisbane Exhibition Ground.

Not only that, but the game was also played on a Monday.

It proved all too confusing for them and they got licked by 69 points.


Brunswick Street Oval



(Fitzroy FC)

 
(Above) Watch 'Around The Grounds' with Billy Miller

Located in the Edinburgh Gardens, Brunswick Street Oval was home to the Fitzroy FC since the club began in 1883.

They stayed there until 1966, playing their final game at the venue against St.Kilda on August 20, losing by 84 points.

The club then moved to the Junction Oval, Victoria Park & Princes Park, but never really found a permanent Home until they merged with the Brisbane Bears in the 1990's.

Fitzroy FC never won another Premiership after they left Brunswick Street Oval. However, they did become successful again after the merger with the Brisbane Bears FC, but as the Brisbane Lions FC, not Fitzroy FC

Canberra Stadium

(Fitzroy FC)
Previously named Bruce Stadium, Canberra Stadium was 'Home' ground for Fitzroy FC in their 1995 Round 9 match against West Coast FC.

11,282 spectators attended and saw West Coast FC win by 28 points.


Coburg City Oval


 

(North Melbourne FC)
The Home ground of VFL club Coburg was used by North Melbourne FC as their Home ground for just one season in 1965.

The move was regarded as a dismal failure however, and they promptly went back to the Arden Street Oval.


Corio Oval

     

(Geelong FC)
This was where Geelong FC first kicked a football in 1859.

They did not begin playing games there until 1871, whenever their usual ground, Argyle Square, was unavailable.

In 1878 they returned to Corio Oval on a permanent basis, and stayed there until 1940 when Corio Oval was required by the military authorities for use as a training facility. They moved to Kardinia Park in 1941, and have remained there ever since.

Corio Oval has since been bulldozed, and is now the site of a hospital and a residential development.


Darling Gardens



(Collingwood FC)
Now a pleasant community park, with wonderful garden settings (pictured above), the Darling Gardens were the venue for Collingwood FC's first practice game (vs. Clifton Hill Junior FC) on April 16, 1892.

They won by 6 goals.

Before the match, the team met in the Yarra Hotel to elect a captain. He was former Britannia FC legend Bill Dean, and was captain for this match only.

The Yarra Hotel was also utilised as the dressing rooms for the club until facilities were built at the nearby Victoria Park, which was built on the site of Dight's Paddock.


East Melbourne Cricket Ground

      

(Essendon FC, University FC and Hawthorn FC)
The East Melbourne Cricket Ground was located at the corner of Wellington Pde. and Jolimont Pde. in East Melbourne, close to the Punt Road Oval and MCG.

Essendon FC were invited to use the facilities of the ground in 1882, and stayed there until 1921, when the ground was closed and subsequently demolished to make way for an extension of the Jolimont railway yards.

The ground was a very popular venue, hosting 30 VFA Finals matches as well as the first ever interstate Football match between Victoria (VFA) and South Australia on July 1, 1879.

The ground was also a Home ground (along with the MCG) for the ill-fated University team between 1908 and 1910.

There are also sources that claim that Hawthorn FC played there in 1905.

The site is now occupied by a semi-circular housing estate with a tower. Some say that it has been designed to look like an ersatz football pavillion.

Euroa Oval

 

(Carlton FC)
Carlton FC played their 1952 'National day Round' 'Home' game, against Hawthorn FC, in the pretty Victorian town of Euroa.

They came back to Princes Park happy, winning by 37 points


Glenferrie Oval



(Hawthorn FC)

 
(Above) Watch 'Around The Grounds' with Billy Miller

The 'Sardine Can' is the ground that is most identified with Hawthorn FC.

Built in the precinct of Grace Park, it was opened in 1903. There are conflicting reports as to when Hawthorn FC first began playing at the venue, originally known as the Hawthorn Cricket Ground. Some say it was in 1905, while other sources claim 1903 or 1904. Either way, the club played their last match at the ground in August 1973, losing to St.Kilda by 20 points.

It was remembered as a narrow, muddy ground right next to the railway line. In fact, there is a story about one umpire mistaking a train whistle for the full-time siren, and temporarily stopping the match before realising his error.
Another story involves what is claimed to be the 'longest kick in history', when 'Captain Blood' Jack Dyer booted the ball into one of the carriages of a goods train that was travelling past at the time. The ball is supposed to have ended up hundreds of kilometres away.

Although many opposition supporters did not like the ground, it is credited with having on of the best grandstands ever built.

After leaving Glenferrie Oval, Hawthorn began playing at Princes Park in 1974.
Glenferrie Oval was kept as the Hawthorn training and administration base until 2005.

In 2006, Waverley Park was their new training and administration home.


Grace Park



(Hawthorn FC)
Although Grace Park Reserve was not the first recorded ground that Hawthorn FC is recorded as having played at, it is the main one before the club moved into Hawthorn Cricket Ground (later renamed Glenferrie Oval).

The history books state that the club first played on a paddock belonging to a local resident named Mr. King, followed by a scratch match at the Hawthorn Cricket Ground, and then another in a paddock below Hawthorn Grammar School in Power St.
The first serious match was played in Mr. Kings paddock, but some horseriders broke Mr. Kings six-foot fence, and he was very furious, marking the end of any matches being played there.

Grace park is historic, however, as this is where Hawthorn FC won their first game in May 1889 against a team known as The Dingoes. The score was 3.9 to 0.1.

Eventually the Hawthorn council purchased some land at Grace Park and this ensured that the club would have somewhere permanent to play. Although it is recorded that the club did rent a place named 'Cam's Paddock', in Urquart St., for one pound a week.

Eventually the club did move to Glenferrie Oval as a permanent base. Some sources record this as being in 1902, while others say 1906. Other sources do not mention Grace Park as being a Hawthorn venue at all, rather stating that they played at St.James Park (on Burwood Rd.), Richmond Racecourse, Punt Road Oval (1904) and East Melbourne Cricket Ground (1905).

Whatever the real story is, Grace Park is an important part of the early history of the Hawthorn FC, even if it just for the fact that the eventual home of the club, Glenferrie Oval, is actually part of the Grace Park precinct, housing the famous Grace Park Tennis Club & a popular playground (pictured above).


Jolimont Park

   

(Melbourne FC)
Probably the most important area of land in Aussie Rules history.

Jolimont Park (also known as the 'Gravel Pit' back then) is where the first ever recorded game of Aussie Rules was played in 1858 between Scotch College and Melbourne Grammar School.
The playing space was between the Jolimont end of the area (where the Clivedon Mansions now stand) and Punt Road, meaning that the goals were more than quarter of a mile apart. A statue of Tom Wills umpiring the game (above) is outside the MCG.

It is also the area where Melbourne FC were forced to play their games after being banned from using the MCG in 1869, because of the damage to the MCG turf being caused by footballers.
The first match on the MCG was between Melbourne FC and the Metropolitan Police Force in that same year. This match was made possible as a result of a request by the Trustees of the ground to the Board of Land and Survey that the Governor-in-Council be asked to grant permission for the MCG to be used for other recreational pursuits as well as cricket. However the MCC Committee viewed the state of the ground after this contest, and football matches were banned until 1879, when a Melbourne vs. Carlton match was allowed to be played on the ground.

The gate takings (500 pounds) were so good that Melbourne FC were given permission to use the ground for half the season, or to within six weeks of the opening of the cricket season.

Spectators would watch the football in Jolimont Park sitting in a unique reversible stand. They could also watch the cricket on the MCG from the same stand. This stand was destroyed by fire in 1884, and proved to be a disastrous loss to the Melbourne FC's finances.


Junction Oval



(St.Kilda FC and Fitzroy FC)

 
(Above) Watch 'Around The Grounds' with Billy Miller

When St.Kilda FC were admitted to the senior ranks of the VFA in 1886, they were allowed to play on the St.Kilda Cricket Ground.

The football and cricket club built a fence around the ground and were able to charge an admission fee.

The St.Kilda Cricket Ground, which was opened in 1852, gained its name of the Junction oval because of its location near the St.Kilda Junction, the intersection of Fitzroy St. and St.Kilda Rd.
The ground has always been well served by public transport, and featured an excellent playing surface.

It was because of these two reasons that many cynics believed St.Kilda was admitted into the newly formed VFL in 1897. But the fact that the club actually finished higher on the 1896 ladder than Carlton and Geelong would have been another important factor as well.

St.Kilda stayed at the Junction Oval until the end of 1964, after which they moved to the Moorabbin Oval.

After leaving Princes Park in 1969, Junction Oval became the new Home for the Fitzroy FC until 1984, when they once again moved ground, this time sharing Victoria Park with Collingwood FC.

The Junction Oval is now the training and administration headquarters for the Melbourne FC., and is still home to the St.Kilda Cricket Club. The Cricket Club have started proceedings to have the venue renamed the Shane Warne Oval, as this is the venue where the champion player not only made his first class debut, but also played cricket for  St.Kilda Cricket Club between 1989 and 2006.

The ground hosted three VFL/AFL Grand Finals (1898, 1899 and 1944) and for many years it was the venue for the VFA Grand Finals.
The VAFA Old Melburnians FC also regularly use the ground for their Home games as well.



Lakeside Oval



(South Melbourne FC)

 
(Above) Watch 'Around The Grounds' with Billy Miller

South Melbourne FC commenced playing its Home games at the Lake Oval (then known as the South Melbourne Cricket Ground) in 1878, just four years after the club was formed.

The club stayed there until their move north up to the Sydney Cricket ground in 1982. They then became known as the Sydney Swans FC.

The move to Sydney was forced upon them, as the choices were move to Sydney, or remain in Melbourne and cease to exist.

The ground is now known as the 'Bob Jane Stadium' and is the Home ground for the South Melbourne Football (Soccer) Club.

The grandstand (above) is not used and has fallen into disrepair. Plans for the future of the grandstand are not clear.

The soccer club wants to demolish it so they can redevelop the ground, Sydney Swans FC want to purchase it and create a museum and administrative building, and the Victorian Government may construct a running track around the oval and relocate Athletics Australia away from their current location at Olympic Park.


Madeleine Street Oval



(Carlton FC)
When Carlton left Royal Park, they made Madeleine Park Oval their Home ground.

However, the University of Melbourne forced them to leave in 1878.

The site of the Madeleine Street Oval is where Newman College (pictured above) now stands at the University of Melbourne grounds in at the north end of Swanston St.

Melbourne MotorDrome



(Melbourne FC)
Built and operated by John Wren's '"Melbourne Carnivals' business consortium, the Melbourne MotorDrome cost £30,000 to build and opened in December 1924.

It ceased operations in 1934 and was dismantled, replaced by the Olympic Park Speedway, which continued on until 1946.

In 1932 the MotorDrome was host to three Melbourne FC 'Home' games.

Moorabbin Oval



(St.Kilda FC)

The Moorabbin Oval, in Linton St. Moorabbin, was the Home ground of St.Kilda FC from 1965 until 1992.

The club then made Waverley Park their Home ground.
They still use the Moorabbin Oval as their training and administration headquarters, but this will only be until 2009, as the club will be setting up their training and administration facilities at Belevedere Park, Seaford, from 2010.

This move came about after disputes with the Kingston Council over re-dvelopment plans for Moorabbin Oval. Once they have moved, it has been stated that the council will be demolishing the historic grandstand.

The club was originally going to move it's base to Frankston Oval, but changed their mind on this arrangement in September 2008.

North Hobart Oval

(Fitzroy FC)
The 1952 'National Day Round' saw Fitzroy FC have their 'Home' game against Melbourne transferred to the North Hobart Oval in Tasmania.

They won by 20 points.

They were so happy that they returned to the venue for another two 'Home' games in 1991 and 1992.


Princes Park Oval

   

(Carlton FC, Fitzroy FC, Footscray FC and Hawthorn FC)

 
(Above) Watch 'Around The Grounds' with Billy Miller

Carlton FC played their first match at Princes Park during Round 6 of the first VFL season in 1897.
They lost to Collingwood FC by 4 points.

It was to become a ground that other teams hated playing at though, and it remained the Home of The Blues until 2005, when they played their final game at the ground. They were defeated by Melbourne, losing by 18 points.

Since then, Carlton have utilised both Telstra Dome and the MCG as their Home ground.

Hawthorn FC began playing at the ground in 1974, staying there until 1991, moving to Waverley park in 1992.

Fitzroy FC club moved to Princes Park in 1967, playing their Home games at the venue until 1969, when they moved on to the Junction Oval.
However, in 1987 Fitzroy FC moved back to Princes Park until 1993.
They then moved, again, to the Western Oval.

The ground was known as Optus Oval between 1994 and 2005. It was named MC Labour Park in 2006, and renamed Visy park in 2009.

It was also home ground for the Collingwood FC VFL side until they moved back to Jock McHale Stadium (Victoria park) in 2010.

It remains the administrative and training base for Carlton FC.


Princes Park-southern end



(Carlton FC)
After Carlton FC was kicked off the Madeleine Street Oval in 1878, the Melbourne City Council granted them permissive occupancy of 11 acres at the southern end of Princes Park, as the result of a petition signed by 3500 ratepayers and supporters.

The area is still home to a couple of cricket/football ovals, as seen in the picture above.


Punt Road Oval



(Richmond FC and Hawthorn FC)

 
(Above) Watch 'Around The Grounds' with Billy Miller

Punt Road Oval was the Home of the Richmond FC from 1885 until 1964.

Although the club was originally formed in 1860, they only played three games (all against Melbourne FC), and promptly went into recess for twenty-five years.

Nicknamed by football fans as 'The Jungle', the ground is situated next to the MCG on the corner of Punt Rd. and Brunton Ave. It was famous for having a large Tiger painted on the roof of its Grandstand for many years.

The club played their last game at the ground on August 22, 1964, before making the MCG their new Home.

The ground is still used as Richmond FC's training and administration base.

Some sources also claim that Hawthorn FC played at Punt Road in 1904.


Richmond Racecourse




(Hawthorn FC)
An area of land was leased to John Wren for the purpose of building the Richmond Racecourse.

Some sources claim that the Hawthorn FC played at the venue in 1903.

Pictured above is the front entrance of the venue.

It ceased to exist in the late 1930's, when the slum abolishment movement began building on the grounds of the racecourse.
The project was finished in 1941. The estate consisted mainly of 'clinker brick' duplex houses.
The area is between Bridge Rd. and the GTV-9 studios in Bendigo St.



Royal Park



(Carlton FC and North Melbourne FC)
Royal Park was the first Home gound of both Carlton and North Melbourne.

It was not far from where the explorers, Burke and Wills, began their epic journey in 1859.

For Carlton, it was the first in a number of area's that they would call home until they eventually played their first game at Princes Park Oval on June 22, 1897 (vs. Collingwood).

North Melbourne played at Royal Park from 1869 until 1880.
In 1881 the club had a temporary home adjacent to the University of Melbourne, before settling at its Home at Arden Street Oval.

Royal Park is still a collection of various football and cricket grounds used by a variety of different suburban clubs. 


St.James Park



(Hawthorn FC)
Some sources claim that Hawthorn FC played the 1902 season within the precincts of St.James Park at Denham and Wood Sts. St.James Park.

is now home to various sporting facilities including the Hawthorn Bowling Club (pictured).


The Triangle, Princes Park



(Carlton FC)
The area opposite the southern end of Princes Park, known as 'The Triangle', was yet another temporary Home for Carlton FC before they settled at the Princes Park Oval.

It is now the site of the University College, previously named the University Women's College.

Toorak Park

(South Melbourne FC & St.Kilda FC)
Well known as the 'Home' ground for VFA club Prahran since 1899 and, since 1995 VAFA club Old Xavierians, Toorak park was also the venue for some VFL clashes during World War II.

When the Junction Oval (along with the MCG and Albert Park) were used by the military as bases, St. Kilda FC were forced to play their 'Home' games there.

They played a total of twelve games there, of which they won five.

In 1944, the defence authorities vacated the Junction Oval and St. Kilda returned home.

South Melbourne FC also played one home game there against Fitzroy in Round 6 in 1942.


Victoria Park

   

(Collingwood FC and Fitzroy FC)

 

 
(Above) Watch 'Around The Grounds' with Billy Miller

Victoria Park was first built, and named, in 1879 on land known as Dight's Paddock.

It became the home of Collingwood FC in 1892, the same year that they were formed.

Because the Grandstand was not completed in time for their first match, against Carlton FC, the team were forced to use the nearby Yarra Hotel as their dressing room for that game.
Although Collingwood lost that match (also their first match in the VFA), the game attracted an amazing crowd of approximately 16,000 spectators!

Over the next 107 years, Victoria Park struck fear into the heart of all opposition teams, and supporters.

Collingwood played their final match at the venue in 1999, when they were defeated by the newly formed Brisbane Lions by 42 points.

They then made the MCG their new home.

The club continued to use Victoria park for training and administrative use until 2004, when they moved to the Westpac Centre (then known as the Lexus Centre) in Yarra Park.

This is the same building that was once the Olympic Pool, and the Melbourne Sports and Entertainment Centre.

Fitzroy FC also called Victoria Park home in 1985 and 1986 before moving back to Princes Park in 1987.

Victoria Park was renamed 'Jock McHale Stadium' in honour of the legendary Collingwood FC coach in the late 1990's.

In 2010 the Collingwood FC VFL team began playing matches at Jock McHale Stadium, a move that was welcomed by magpie supporters everywhere. 


WACA



(West Coast FC and Fremantle Dockers FC)

When the West Coast Eagles first formed, they shared Home ground matches between Subiaco Oval and the WACA until 2000.
They now only play Home matches at Subiaco Oval.

The Fremantle Dockers FC also played their Home games at the WACA from their first year, 1995, until 2000.
They also utilise Subiaco as their Home ground now.

72 AFL games were played at this ground.


Waverley Park

   

(Hawthorn FC and St.Kilda FC)
Originally named VFL Park and built as a neutral ground, 'Arctic Park' opened in 1970.

It had a sensational playing surface, 200 metres in lenght and 160 metres wide.

Unfortunately it was built in the middle of a 'rain-belt'. This was not good because there was a distinct lack of undercover seating.
Because of its location it was also a terrible ground to get to using public transport, and most spectators drove to the ground.
This caused all sorts of problems whenever there was a big attendance, as it could take up to 3 hours after a match to actually get out of the carpark.

Many spectators would sit by the water catchment and catch Yabbies while waiting for the carpark to empty.

Hawthorn FC made Waverley Park their Home in 1992 after leaving Princes Park.

When Waverley Park was closed in 1999, they moved to the MCG.
Hawthorn did, however, move to Waverley Park again in 2006, using the ground as their training and administration centre.

St.Kilda made the move to Waverley Park in 1993, and stayed there, also, until the end of the 1999 season.
They then moved to the Etihad Stadium (then called Docklands Stadium), and are still there.

Waverley Park was host to the 1991 Grand Final due to the Great Southern Stand being built at the MCG.
It was also host to many pre-season Grand Finals, World Series Cricket matches and many big concerts including Kiss and David Bowie.

All of the stands, apart from the Members Stand, have been demolished, and the parking area is now covered in houses. The playing field remains untouched.


Western Oval (Whitten Oval)

   

(Footscray FC and Fitzroy FC)

 
(Above) Watch 'Around The Grounds' with Billy Miller

The Western Oval was originally known as the Western Reserve, and became Home ground for the Footscray FC in 1879 after recieving permission from the local council.

In the previous 2 years, Footscray were forced to play at several different grounds with no real place to call Home.

Footscray FC stayed at the Western Oval until 1940.
In 1941 the club moved to the Yarraville Oval allowing the Western Oval to be used as camp for soldiers on their way to New Guinea during World War Two.

They moved back to the Western Oval in 1943, remaining there until 1996.

In the 1997 season Footscray FC (then renamed the Western Bulldogs FC) moved to Princes Park (then known as Optus Oval).

The Western Oval was renamed Whitten Oval in 1995 in memory of club legend Ted 'E.J.' Whitten. A statue of Whitten is now outside the ground.

 Fitzroy FC moved their Home matches to the Western Oval in 1994 and stayed there until their merger with Brisbane Bears FC in 1996. And that was the end of the Fitzroy FC. From 1997 they played at the Gabba as the Brisbane Lions FC.


Windy Hill



(Essendon FC)

 
(Above) Watch 'Around The Grounds' with Billy Miller

Officially known as the Essendon Recreational Reserve, Windy Hill has been occupied by the Essendon FC since 1922, after they left the East Melbourne Cricket Ground in 1921.

Essendon FC played their final Home game at Windy Hill in 1991. They then played at the MCG until 1999 and moved to their current Home ground, Etihad Stadium, in 2000.

Located in Napier St., Windy Hill is still the training ground and administrative headquarters of Essendon FC, and also houses the spectacular Bomber Shop and museum.
The museum is well worth visiting (even if you are not an Essendon FC supporter) with a fantastic display showcasing the history of the club, its champion players, plus a brilliant Trophy cabinet showcasing all of the clubs Premiership Cups. 

In 2010 the club began searching for another home because of a dispute with the Essendon Bowling Club located next to the ground.

Yallourn Oval

(Footscray FC)
Yallourn...There one day, gone the next.

Built between the 1020's and 1950's to house employees of the State Electricity Commission of Victoria who operated the nearby Yallourn Power Station Complex, it was closed and subsequently removed in the 1980's due to the expansion of the adjacent open-cut brown coal mine.

But in 1952 the town Oval was the venue for Footscray FC and St.Kilda FC during the 1952 'National Day Round'.

Footscray lost by 15 points. Maybe because St.Kilda traditionally enjoyed a 'wet track', and it does not get any wetter than being able to water-ski on the Oval!


Yarraville Oval



(Footscray FC)
Yarraville Oval was the temporary Home for Footscray FC in 1941 and 1942.
They moved there because the Western Oval was being used as a camp for soldiers on their way to New Guinea during World War Two.

In 1943, Footscray FC moved back to the Western Oval.

The Yarraville Oval is still used as a local Football ground today.

AFL CLUB STADIUMS SECTION

Return to top

 
Search Our Site

Search for:




Date and Time



Aussie Sport TV


ONLY AVAILABLE TO USERS
OUTSIDE AUSTRALIA



Skype





Copyright 2014, AustralianRulesFootball.com.au